Sleep monitoring cure

This topic contains 2 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by RonA 6 days, 20 hours ago.

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  • #30655

    RonA
    ✘ Not a client

    Hi all.  I want to share a good breathing tool that appears to have helped me get to sleep faster when I awake in the middle of the night.   10 days ago, I quit Ambien and had a rough six nights only getting 2-3 hours of sleep a night.  I then found this breathing exercise and it seems to keep my mind engaged in a boring task and not thinking about falling back asleep when I wake up.  As a result, the last three nights I have averaged 6 hours sleep and have fallen back asleep almost immediately each time upon awakening.  It has only been 3 nights, so I do not want to say my insomnia is gone but I have not sleep this well in the last 5 months.   I have also done sleep restriction at the same time so I am sure that is a big reason too.

    Anyhow here is the link:  http://countingbreaths.com/fob/benefits/insomnia/

    #30666

    Martin Reed
    ★ Admin

    Thanks for sharing, Ron. I think it’s important to bear in mind that no relaxation exercise can make us sleep, because the only thing that generates sleep is our own body.

    Relaxation exercises can help us relax, and this can make sleep easier — but if we make sleep the goal of relaxation we can encounter a problem because we can self-monitor for sleep when relaxing (making sleep less likely) or, if sleep occurs in the short-term then sleep issues return, we can think that the relaxation technique is no longer “working” and then scramble to look for a new solution!

    Another good resource for relaxation techniques is Darmouth College. Here’s a link:

    https://students.dartmouth.edu/wellness-center/wellness-mindfulness/relaxation-downloads

    #30672

    RonA
    ✘ Not a client

    Martin, good points.  I always need to remind myself that I am sleeping because of me.

    I was recommending this counting process as more of a distraction, than a relaxation technique.  It feels to me that if you remain focused on counting your breathes, your brain will be less likely to be self monitoring for sleep.  The last three nights I have tried this, in less than 5 minutes I start losing track of my counting and I have drifted back to sleep.

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